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Finding a part-time job as an exchange student

Dai has been studying at a university in Japan as an exchange student for six months and is thinking about finding a part-time paid job.
She asks Chi-ling, a senior exchange student, for her advice.

Dai

I am thinking about taking a part-time job, as I feel like I am settling down well in my college life in Japan.
Chi-ling
Well, do you know that exchange students first need to get permission called shikakugai katsudo kyoka (Permit to Engage in Activity other than that Permitted under the Status of Residence Previously Granted) to legally work part-time in Japan?

Dai

Do I really need to obtain special permission to work only part-time?

Chi-ling

We are in Japan under a residential status of "exchange student" whose purpose of residence here is to study at school. Working part-time is considered other activities than what we are allowed with this status and therefore requires this special permission.

Dai

I see.

Chi-ling

With the proper permission, maximum work hours are still limited to 28 hours per week, or eight hours per day during long-term school breaks such as summer break.

Dai

Why are we allowed to work only for limited hours?

Chi-ling

Again, we exchange students are here to study at school. The limit of work hours suggests this is the maximum hours we should spend so that such part-time work won't interfere with our schoolwork.

Dai

That makes sense.

Chi-ling

Also, there are some types of work which exchange students cannot take, such as bars and other similar entertainment service establishments where servers are seated at a customer's table to serve foods and drinks. We cannot work at those places even as a dishwasher or a cleaner.

Dai

I will remember that. So, where should I apply for this permission?
Chi-ling
An application for shikakugai katsudo kyoka is accepted at regional immigration bureaus . You will be asked to show your passport, alien registration card, and student ID card. You also need to fill out an application form, which can be picked up at the immigration bureau.

Now that she knows how to legally work in Japan, Dai is still not sure where and how to find a part-time job.

Dai
Chi-ling, how did you find your part-time job?

Chi-ling

I went to the student service office of my university. Some schools place job information on their website for their students.
Dai
Are there any other places besides schools that may help me find a job?

Chi-ling

One of my friends found her part-time job at Hello Work, which is a public employment office. There are 17 Hello Work offices throughout Tokyo, so visit one of those if you are interested. Also, at the Shinjuku Foreigners' Employment Assistance and Guidance Center, interpreters are available in English, Chinese, Spanish, and Portuguese to help you search work. Of course, you may seek a job on your own at job information websites and community papers.

Dai

There are many ways to search for a job--thank you so much for your information. By the way, I am a bit concerned if I encounter any troubles at work.

Chi-ling

If you need someone's advice on pay, work conditions, work-related injuries, and such, you should consult the Tokyo Metropolitan Labor Consultation Center. The center offers consultation services in English and Chinese for foreign workers.

Dai

It is good to know that there is a place to ask for help if anything happens.

Chi-ling

It is harder than you might think to keep good balance between school and work. However, I have made lots of Japanese friends outside the school after I started working part-time. It's been a great experience to expand my view. I hope you will find a good part-time job, Dai.

Dai

Thanks for your support. I will let you know once I find anything!