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ごみの分別 「家庭用ごみ、どう分けて出せばいい?」

Louisa, who has recently moved to Japan, is standing in front of her door, peering into a garbage bag. Reiko, an acquaintance of Louisa, happens to walk by.

Reiko
Hi Louisa, are you doing all right? You seem like something's on your mind.
Louisa
Hi Reiko-san. I'm a little worried. The apartment janitor told me the other day that I have to follow the garbage disposal rules better.
Reiko
Well, let's see… Oh, you shouldn't put broken ceramics or empty cans with burnable trash. Ceramics should be grouped as non-burnable trash here. Cans and bottles are collected separately as recyclables.
Louisa
I see, thanks for your help. I really have no idea how to separate these different types of trash..
Reiko
Did you get a book about garbage rules from city office?
Louisa
I did, but I haven't taken much of a look at it yet. I don't read kanji very well.
Reiko
Don't worry. It should have illustrations to help foreign people understand the rules.
Louisa
Really? I'll go grab it and take a look now.
Reiko
Sounds good, we can go over the rules together.

Louisa and Reiko read the booklet together. Reiko writes down hiragana to help Louisa read some difficult kanji characters.

Louisa
Now I understand the garbage rules much better. Thanks so much for your help!
Reiko
They can be confusing for anyone at first. Each community has its own trash collection rules, so every time I move to a different area I have to learn new rules, and it always takes time to get used to them.
Louisa
That's a relief to hear.
Reiko
If you come up with any more questions, you can always ask the local waste collection office or city office. Like it says in the book, you need to make special arrangements to dispose of large garbage like furniture.
Louisa
Thanks. I'll look at the book some more and give them a call if I have any questions.

Please refer here for information on garbage collection.

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